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I Fucked Up!


 
11/16/2005 5:18 PM
Jaicen
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I Fucked Up!
Hey guys, i'm back again. Been away for far too long I think!  
The reason i'm back is because i'm looking for help (take take take..)  
I've just finished my second guitar. First time i've built a neck. I think it turned out pretty good, the action is a little high and the fretting leaves a little to be desired, but not bad for a first 100% diy job! Trouble is, I can't get it to intonate properly on the Low E and D strings. They seem flat no matter what I do, the other strings are pretty much ok though. I suspect that i've angled the bridge slightly too much (Standard tunomatic config).  
Is there anything I can do, short of re-setting the bridge, to fix this? I'm supposed to be giving this guitar to a friend at the weekend, but I can't unless there's a quick fix around!  
The nut is cut slightly high, perhaps it would be helpful to lower it slightly?? Also, the front of the guitar is covered in mirror perspex, hence my unwillingness to relocate the bridge!  
 
Thanks guys,  
-*Jaicen
 
11/17/2005 4:41 PM
Borsanova
If you can lower the action, this may change the situation quite a lot. I had a similar problem with my Ibanez 345's G-string and when I lowered the bridge the problem disappeared.
 
 
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11/22/2005 1:07 PM
Jaicen
email

Well, I fixed the problem!  
 
Turned out to be the nut, which was cut too high. I dropped the action as well, and that pretty much solved the problem!
 
11/25/2005 10:46 AM
Jaicen
email

I don't know if anybody's interested, but there's a picture of my guitar at the end of this link:  
 
http://storage.msn.com/x1p3q6ujd6xcOpOfW-G0f53Of6axOUXKnK79AStM-yR3ZU-KL94YopK-ciAuBJQzLGTKe0N7vhQDBZlP8-2xqhTySHGRn1OSGG24_XY1xGHXouIjokOmwoEKaNB0zFaiZWFOTupLgWguH8SeP0o7yAkZg  
 
The body is made from yellow poplar, with a mirror front and back. There's also a massive cavity to hold the Fuzz Factory electronics, but even so, it weighs as much as a strat, maybe a little more!  
Neck is the first I've built from scratch using AAA birds-eye maple, which is really a waste of money. It's not really figured enough to warrant the hefty mark up (3.5x). Fingerboard is some gorgeous indian rosewood, really fine and straight grained, which I was a little surprised with. Looks great after applying the lemon oil, smells just as good too!  
All in all, not perfect, but pretty damn good. Only cost £260 all in too (no knobs or straplocks yet though).
 
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