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Re: Oops!


 
8/26/2004 2:51 PM
Wild Bill
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Re: Oops!
Gentlemen, I think we're all just victims of a troll.  
 
He's simply having fun. If he truly believed his points he wouldn't conveniently ignore rebuttals or give so-called supporting evidence that is irrelevant to the point in question.  
 
I've got better things to do...like build amps!  
 
---Wild Bill
 
8/26/2004 6:20 PM
DD
Could be Wild Bill. You have all the answers. You da man.
 
 
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8/27/2004 1:58 AM
PeteRH
Let me clarify something.  
I like using Teflon wire. It doesnt give off fumes or melt if given a bit too much heat. I can buy it a lot cheaper than fender style cloth covering. Finally I dont think anyone has said it sounds any better.  
 
As for silver wire, if I offer it as an option and an audiophile buyer wants to pay extra....well why not.  
 
As for the site.....it is interesting to me and I dont class myself as an audiophile or fool.
 
8/27/2004 8:36 AM
Newt
email
Sorry, Pete....
I wasn't in any way directing that comment to you; I just tacked it on to the end of the thread. I was just amused at the thread in general. I believe that if the conductor is enough for the current and the insulator is adequate, the rest is up to the user's preference as to color, covering, stranded vs. solid, etc. Whatever one likes to work with is fine; I just don't believe it makes any significant difference in the performance of the amp.  
 
Again, I apologize for any unintended offense taken; none was intended.
 
8/30/2004 6:49 AM
Tonestack Re: What type of Wire for Amp Project?
A lot of guys in this forum will try to sell you down the Audiofool River. The most important aspect of tube amp wiring is lead dress. I often use bargain basement 20AWG 300V Bell wire, and my amps are loved by the likes of Paul Smith (as in Paul Reed Smith) and John Ingram (Paul’s first apprentice and founding member of PRS Guitars).  
 
Additionally, when wiring any post-PI control ("cut," "master" et al.), remember to tightly twist the two leads from the circuit board to the control and back. The post-PI leads are one-hundred and eighty degrees out of phase; thus, by twisting them together, they cancel out a large percentage of each other's emitted radiation (twisting the leads together will also introduce a very small amount capacitance into the equation). This trick is used in telephony to reduce crosstalk in wire bundles (i.e., twisted-pair wire).
 
11/8/2004 1:55 PM
kg
email

quote:
"Additionally, when wiring any post-PI control ("cut," "master" et al.), remember to tightly twist the two leads from the circuit board to the control and back. The post-PI leads are one-hundred and eighty degrees out of phase; thus, by twisting them together, they cancel out a large percentage of each other's emitted radiation (twisting the leads together will also introduce a very small amount capacitance into the equation). This trick is used in telephony to reduce crosstalk in wire bundles (i.e., twisted-pair wire)."
 
 
... and it will add drastically to the shunt capacitance of those two circuit nodes.
 
11/8/2004 2:11 PM
kg
email

i'd like to point out a couple of things:  
 
if a control grid is kept well negative wrt the cathode, it draws NO current.  
 
a simple common cathode gain stage sitting there idling will have 0vdc and 0vac on the grid, and no grid current will flow in either direction across the grid return resistor.  
 
now, impose a 2vpp ac signal on the grid. just so we are sure to impose NO dc whatsoever, couple it into the grid circuit with a 1:1 transformer.  
 
during the +ve 1v excursion, electrons will be drawn up through the grid return resistor and will be sucked up by the driving impedance.  
 
during the -ve excursion, electrons will flow back the other way, through the grid return resistor and back into the ground circuit.  
 
we have PURE ac signal, with NO dc component. current flows in BOTH directions, equally.  
 
replacing the input transformer with a cap makes no difference to our circuit. current will still be alternately "drawn" and "pushed" through the grid return resistor.  
 
coupling that cap input to a previous stage makes no difference to the function of our circuit. the cap does not know, nor care, what kind of DC baseline is on the other side.  
 
furthermore, placing that circuit inside of a chassis and calling it an "amplifier" makes no difference to the circuit.  
 
one could just as easily substitute a MOSFET where the tube is in this example and there would be no difference.  
 
things to think about..  
ken
 
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