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1963 Fender Duo-Sonic Wiring Schematic


 
10/27/1999 1:54 PM
Mac
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1963 Fender Duo-Sonic Wiring Schematic
I'm not an electronics wizard by any stretch, but I need to know the function of the 3-way toggle switch when the two pickups are wired in series. I'm not sure how the wiring from/to the pickups should be soldered to the toggle switch since there are 5 points that can be soldered (one to ground). I have Oz and S-D schematics but I don't understand what the switch does the way it's laid out. Does anyone out there have a copy of a Fender '60's Duo-Sonic schemo, or can explain in laymans terms how the wiring should be soldered, and the switch function?
 
10/27/1999 6:05 PM
J Fletcher
I thought the pickup switch selected, position #1 front pickup only, #2 front and back pickups in parallel, and #3, back pickup only. Didn't think there was any series combination. Not very familiar with this model though...Jerry
 
 
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10/27/1999 6:27 PM
Mac
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Jerry, thats what I thought also, but if you look at Seymour-Duncans schemo they are wired in series and it just dosen't make any sense to me. Like I said, I'm not an electronics man and I only know enough to get me in trouble.
 
10/27/1999 7:16 PM
J Fletcher
Well if they're in series, then to select the front pickup you need to short across the back pickup coil. That is, the white and black pickup leads need to be connected together through the switch. That takes the back pickup out. Same if you want the back pickup only, short across the front coil. Not knowing what the switch is configured like, I can't tell you how to connect it to do this though....Jerry
 
10/29/1999 2:07 PM
Mac
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The 3-way toggle switch has 5 soldering points, 4 at one end (in pairs) and 1 at the other end. The single point, and the outer point of each pair goes to ground. In the neutral (center) position all points are connected. Moving the toggle up or down isolates the outer point (to ground) on either side. Now having said that, go to:  
 
http://www.seymourduncan.com/duo.html  
 
What I don't understand is how this works based upon the SD drawing. What causes the unselected pickup to drop out, or is it just a voltage thing that causes one pickup to become more sensitive than the other?  
 
 
10/29/1999 3:49 PM
jason
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Look at the switch in the diagram you provided.  
There are 6 lugs on the switch, 3 aren't used.  
Look at the top right lug and notice that it is connected to ground. Notice that the bottom right lug is connected to the output. Now if the switch is selecting the neck pickup imagine a short from the lower right lug to the center lug. The puts the yellow wire of the neck pickup to the output jack and the black wire is already tied to ground so the neck pickup works. Also notice that in this position the bridge pickup is shorted out (white wire connected to bottom lug, black wire connected to center lug and the switch has these 2 lugs shorted in this position.  
If the switch is moved to play the bridge pickup only imagine a short on the switch from the top lug to the center lug. The center lug is now grounded through the switch so the neck pickup is shorted out, and the bride pickup now has ground on the black wire and the white wire is already tied to the output so now you have bridge pickup only.  
With the switch in the center position don't worry about looking at the switch, no lugs short together so now the white wire of the bridge pickup is connected to the output (as always) and the black wire of the bridge pickup is connected to the yellow wire of the neck pickup (as always)and the black wire of the neck pickup is tied to ground (as always) and both pickups are on (and connected in series).  
I hope that makes some sense(typed it kinda fast-quitin' time).  
jason
 
10/29/1999 5:39 PM
Mac
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Thanks Jason. I think I've got it now. I guess what confused me the most was the 6 lugs on the drawing and the fact that my switch only has 5, and only 3 lugs are utilized. I realize now that shorting across the pickup effectively breaks the loop for that pickup.
 
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