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previous: Dai H. Steve, you might try this freeware ... -- 1132939484 View Thread

Re: WHAT'S UP WITH YAHOO?

11/28/2005 9:29 AM
MBSetzer
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Re: WHAT'S UP WITH YAHOO?
With the Zone Alarm Pro firewall there is a Cache Cleaner function that is thorough and convenient.  
 
Or if you are using DOS-based windows like W98 you sometimes benefit by deleting the temporary internet files first using the browser itself, then restarting the computer and then *shut down* again but select *restart in MSDOS mode*.  
Windows will be shut down and you will be at the DOS prompt C:\WINDOWS\  
 
type in DELTREE TEMPOR~1, hit Enter and it will ask you if you want to delete all the files and subfolders from C:\WINDOWS\TEMPOR~1. Enter *Y* and it may take a while (lots less time than a defrag though) but your C:\WINDOWS\Temporary Internet Files\ folder will be eradicated along with everything it contained.  
 
In this case I think this is about equivalent to what you might have accomplished by defragmentation, seems to me it would be a good idea to remove the TEMPOR~1 folder before a defrag too.  
 
Anyway, once you restart Windows, whenever there is no C:\WINDOWS\Temporary Internet Files\ folder, as soon as you get online and IE needs a place for its temporary files, it will automatically create a fresh new folder for you.  
TEMPOR~1 is just the 8-character DOS abbreviation for Temporary Internet Files since DOS does not like long file names (LFN) including spaces.  
 
Also in W98, if you back up the C: volume by xxcopying to a spare or slave partition, afterward you can delete x:\Windows\Temporary Internet Files\ from the backup copy as well as x:\Windows\Win386.swp which will reduce the size of the uncompressed backup copy without hampering its ability to function when you do need to boot to the *x:* volume in the future, or xxcopy from *x:* to a blank formatted partition to recover the backed-up system.  
 
Mike

 
Replies:
Steve Dallman Thanks. We are running fine again. ... -- 11/29/2005 5:30 PM