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How do I make My own HB covers?


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6/20/2005 1:15 PM
anonymous How do I make My own HB covers?
Getting them plated is no problem but how are they made? One piece of metal? multiple pieces?
 
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6/20/2005 4:22 PM
Spartacus
They're a "deep drawn" stamping process that is an extremely expensive, multi-step process. Deep Draw dies can cost upwards of $30,000.  
 
So the answer is: Unless you got that kinda cash, or a home to mortgage,...you don't =(
 
6/21/2005 5:16 AM
Joey
Don't be so sure you can't do it. Look into getting a fly press or a hydraulic press ( Grizzly's a good source and they're into guitars ). You will have to find a friendly tool maker or blacksmith to make the die. You can harden steel yourself if you have the know-how.
 
6/23/2005 10:50 AM
A nonymouse
Well, it all depends. How many do you want? What material? How beautiful do you want them? Small quantity (hundreds), no need for hard tooling. Plain low-carbon steel is fine. Maybe even aluminum. 7075-T6. Larger quantity needs case hardened steel. Material. Copper plates beautifully. Draws easily. 1000-series aluminum, likewise easy but not so great to plate. Brass. Needs to be annealed. Sometimes several times. Steel, low carbon sheet draws easily.  
 
If you don't mind a few wrinkles at the corners, not real hard to do. Don't need hydraulics. A good big bench vise will do fine for small quantity.  
 
For just a couple, a wooden die set will work. Maple. The hardest you can find. Trimming and punching the holes is the hard part.  
 
Any decent machine shop will make you a hardened die set for probably $1000. But, probably you're better off jobbing the whole thing out if you want 100 or more.  
 
Yes, you can do it if you really, really want to. Not the easiest thing in the world, but possible. Why?
 
6/25/2005 8:05 AM
Steve A.

A nonymous queried:  
 
Yes, you can do it if you really, really want to. Not the easiest thing in the world, but possible. Why?  
 
 
    Good question! I had read that Seth Lover searched high and low for a metal that was easy to solder and would not drastically change the sound of the humbucker, and ended up using German steel (whatever that might be).  
 
    I'm sure that someone in China is manufacturing them these days and if you order enough of them it should bring the price down... or not. :(  
 
Steve Ahola
 
6/25/2005 8:30 AM
Joe Gwinn

On 6/25/2005 2:05 PM, Steve A. said:  
[QUOTE]A nonymous queried:  
 
Yes, you can do it if you really, really want to. Not the easiest thing in the world, but possible. Why?  
 
 
    Good question! I had read that Seth Lover searched high and low for a metal that was easy to solder and would not drastically change the sound of the humbucker, and ended up using German steel (whatever that might be).[/QUOTE]I think what Set Lover used is German Silver (not steel). German silver is really a form of brass, one with high nickel content, so it's silver colored, not brass colored. It does not contain any silver, despite the name, is not expensive, and is easily worked. And soft soldered.
 
6/25/2005 9:58 AM
Eric H

German silver is the old name for nickel-silver, and its also used to make most fretwire
 

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