ampage
Tube Amps / Music Electronics
For current discussions, please visit Music Electronics Forum. New: view Recent Searches.
New: visit Schematic Hell!
The sunn still shines online!

 
Listen to great tunes streaming live right now!

ampage archive

Vintage threads from the first ten years

Search for:  Mode:  

survey2: what field to get into?


 
9/22/2000 12:35 AM
Paul C
email
survey2: what field to get into?
Well, here's something I've been wanting input on...  
I'm 33yrs old and I've been a repair tech in Nashville for 6 years. I spent my 20's trying to be a rock star...sigh. Anyway, I'm about to be a dad any day now, so the thoughts of what to do to put this kid in college are starting! I've got a degree in Recording Eng with minors in Electronics and Music Comp, but I'm thinking of going for a full blown EE thing or CS. I can't decide, but I'd like the EE stuff just so next time I see Randall A at the NAMM show I can talk about stuff a little deeper then types of tolex!! Need to make some money folks! I figure also since everybody is going CS in school the job market for EE's seems to be growing... Thoughts?
 
9/22/2000 1:04 AM
Hi
email

I can't imagine the market for EEs getting smaller, unless technology collapses entirely. Most of my old friends are EEs BTW, mostly in the defense industry. They make good money, that's for sure. The stress level is another thing...  
Hi
 
9/22/2000 3:20 PM
dgiust
I'd have to agree with these guys, and I can easily relate to your situation because it's very similiar to my own. I had a strat, a Marshall, and a lot of hair in the 80s, worked as a tech (trade school certificate) for a lot of years. I started school part time, ended up full time.Took me 8 years to get my EE.I didn't get my degree until I was 35,two months before my 36th.  
All I have to say is...DO IT!
 
9/22/2000 2:20 AM
Lee M.
email

I recruit (mechanical) engineering coops at the U of Illinois. At the semi-annual job fairs, the companies drawing the largest crowds are the ones recruiting EE, CompE, and CS. I'd say EE is the most practical of the three and would provide the widest range of opportunities.  
 
Lee
 
9/23/2000 5:27 PM
Steve A.
email

Lee:  
 
I'd say EE is the most practical of the three and would provide the widest range of opportunities.  
 
    Living right next to the Silicon Valley, it seems like everybody is pursuing degrees and careers in Computer Science (that is what CS means- right?) so that there will usually be more applicants than positions available. Looking at the ads for people with EE degrees, it seems like they are begging for qualified applicants...  
 
Steve Ahola  
 
P.S. LeeŚ is a two-year degree in EE worth the paper it is printed on, or do you need a BS to get a decent entry level job as an EE? I'll be 49 next month and I'd much rather be pushing electrons around on paper than changing out compressors on hot rooftops...   ;)  
 
9/23/2000 7:23 PM
Lee M.
email

>P.S. LeeŚ is a two-year degree in EE worth the  
>paper it is printed on, or do you need a BS  
>to get a decent entry level job as an EE?  
 
I think in Fortune 500 companies, a 2 year degree is going to relegate a person to "technician" status. At my firm (Robert Bosch), only people with bona fide 4 year engineering degrees can get jobs with the engineer title. Nothing wrong with being a tech though and they still make decent money, just not what an engineer makes.  
 
Lee
 
9/23/2000 11:13 PM
Steve A.
email

Lee:  
 
    So your company does hire people with a two-year degreeŚ an industrious person could then get his 4-year degree taking classes at night to apply for a position as an engineer...  
 
--Thanks!  
 
Steve Ahola
 
   Page 1 of 3 Next> Last Page>>