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Re: Good call, Steve


 :
4/27/2000 3:50 PM
Trace
Re: Good call, Steve
quote:
"I just checked the BBS logs Steve, and your suspicions are correct; with the possible exception of Harry, they're definitely all the same jerk."
 
 
It makes you wonder what makes a man act like that? If ignorance is bliss then he's in paradise  
 
;^)  
Trace
 
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4/27/2000 5:17 PM
Steve Slick

Just a few last remarks about all these posts, I promise.  
 
I'm out of my league here guys. I would have never figured out all that stuff about the LA-2A compressor run onto tape. That's what's neat bout this Internet. 10 year ago, how would I have ever found that out without talking to you guys?  
 
While I do the same thing--trying to figure out a certain sound--trying to sound like Eddie has to be a curiosity, not a career. Here in Texas it is Stevie Ray Vaughn. His rig is no secret. I've found the real kicker it the Univibe and Leslie rotating-speaker sound. If you've got that, almost any setup can get real close.  
 
But when guys do that, they just sound like Stevie Ray-wannabes. When he first died I really enjoyed it. For me it was a way of hanging onto the potential Stevie-Ray had. But now it just sounds like a dated imitation. Hard to do? Yes. Wanna keep hearing it? Not really. I'll just pop on a Stevie Ray CD and get it from the source.  
 
Another observation I agreed with is the Eddie-Alex connection. I'm a guitar player, not a drummer. But that Alex is, IMHO, about the best I've ever seen. Add that uncanny communication to Eddie and you get: Van Halen. What guitar player doesn't rank them at the top?  
 
Thanks tboy for the admin work. Now that the game is up, maybe this guy will drop it and join in and be part of the real fun here, vacuum tube electronics and amplifiers.  
 
Trace, thanks too for the drug stuff. I wasn't trying to push my beliefs above. But I think the best policy is just say no to drugs. Look at it statistically. Can drugs help enhance creativity? I can't prove it can't, so for the sake of argument, let's just say the possibility exists.  
 
But we all know hundreds of people whose lives have been destroyed by them. So, when a musician plays with drugs, he's gambling his whole paycheck--actually more, his whole life, talent, loved ones, money, etc.--on the lottery. Kinda stupid, eh?  
 
I like to tell my friends here in Texas who get excited about the lottery that their chances of coming down with Leukemia are much higher than winning big on the lottery. It kinda takes the joy out of throwing money at it. But, it's the same thing with drugs: wage everything on the unproven possibility that they MAY help you musically?  
 
Statistically, if you work hard, practice and study at being a good musician, there's a near 100% chance that the worst thing that can happen to you is your an unrecognized musician that has a skill that is intensely enjoyable to you and the envy of almost everybody you know.  
 
Sometimes it's not upbringing, religion, creativity, or anything else. Sometimes it's just plain old stupidity. Leo Dorocher(?) once said all ballplayers make mistakes; the good one's don't make the same ones twice. Sounds like DG is training to be a good ballplayer.  
 
Thanks To All,  
 
Steve Slick
 
4/27/2000 5:52 PM
Trace

quote:
"Here in Texas it is Stevie Ray Vaughn. His rig is no secret. I've found the real kicker it the Univibe and Leslie rotating-speaker sound. If you've got that, almost any setup can get real close."
 
 
SRV is amazing! I watched a live bootleg from early on in his career and he had all Marshalls behind him. He still sounded like SRV!!! (ha, ha) A lot of it is in your hands and how you play. There's no doubt about that. If you have a good amp and can play well...you're all set! :)  
 
quote:
"But when guys do that, they just sound like Stevie Ray-wannabes. When he first died I really enjoyed it. For me it was a way of hanging onto the potential Stevie-Ray had. But now it just sounds like a dated imitation. Hard to do? Yes. Wanna keep hearing it? Not really. I'll just pop on a Stevie Ray CD and get it from the source."
 
 
How about Albert King? ;-) Stevie borrowed heavily from him but he still did his own thing. That's the cool part about the blues, it's all there for the taking. Stevie was the man!  
 
quote:
"Trace, thanks too for the drug stuff. I wasn't trying to push my beliefs above. But I think the best policy is just say no to drugs. Look at it statistically. Can drugs help enhance creativity? I can't prove it can't, so for the sake of argument, let's just say the possibility exists."
 
 
I hear you mate :) I've seen some really horrible stuff when it comes to what drugs can do to people so I am sympathetic. It's hard not to be when you have attended funerals where your friends have over dosed from drugs.  
 
Trace
 
4/28/2000 2:19 AM
Steve Slick
Re: Trace, Stevie Ray, and Albert King
Dang you Trace! You're a man after my own heart. Why did you have to bring up Albert King? Youíre right about Stevie Ray copying his licks from others. But first a quick story.  
 
Sometime in 84-85, there was a cover story about Stevie Ray in Guitar Player magazine. He listed his influences: Albert King, Freddie King, B.B. King, Albert Collins, Guitar Slim, Muddy Waters... and Buddy Guy, to name a few. Iíve still got that issue somewhere.  
 
I had an apartment in Washington, D.C. I went everywhere looking for these guys and had a real hard time, especially finding Buddy Guy. Finally, I went over into the really dangerous part of N.E. D.C. to a record shop.  
 
The owner, an old black man, was very suspicious of me at first. I believe he thought I was a cop. I probably looked the part. I asked him if he had any Buddy Guy. He leaned way out over the counter, looked me right in the eyes and said, "Whatís chubby white boy like you doing over here looking for Buddy Guy for, huh?"  
 
I told him exactly why. He grinned real big, busted out into a loud laugh and said, "Well, I ainít seen any Buddy Guy in years, but I got plenty of Albert King, Freddie King, B.B. King, Albert Collins, and Muddy Waters."  
 
I loaded up. I did finally get some Buddy Guy and over the years Iíve listened to these guys so much I can tell 3 notes into a song which one is playing.  
 
PBS had a great special a few years ago called Miles Ahead about Miles Davis. Iíve still got it too. In it Miles talks about how he had to learn from others, i.e., copy their licks. At one point he says something that is profound. He said, "You have to play a long time before you can get your sound." What he meant is he copied the other guys until he mastered that. Then, and only then, he created his unique sound.  
 
In that same special Gil Evans talks about the same thing. He made the motions of a funnel with sand coming out of it and said, "Miles took all these other guys [Dizzy, Bird, Monk, and Bud Powell] mixed them together, and out came Miles Davis.  
 
Iím still in the "learning the other guys" stage myself. But, I donít care; Iím enjoying myself.  
 
What Stevie did was take all those other guys, mixed them together and came out with Stevie Ray. When I hear the imitators, all I hear is a guy taking Steveie Ray and funneling out his attempt at Stevie Ray.  
 
Theyíre better than I am, most of them. But theyíre still in the copy stage, not in the create stage. Iím into the real thing. And buddy, Albert King was the real deal!  
 
Now, donít you ever bring that up again. I got nuts when I start thinking about them...  
 
Cheers,  
 
Steve Slick
 
4/28/2000 5:58 PM
Trace

quote:
"Dang you Trace! You're a man after my own heart. Why did you have to bring up Albert King? Youíre right about Stevie Ray copying his licks from others."
 
 
I don't know...good question!!! (ha, ha) Most of the guys who listen to my band would have no idea that I listen to blues players! (ha, ha) I listen to a great many things for many different reasons.  
 
quote:
"The owner, an old black man, was very suspicious of me at first. I believe he thought I was a cop. I probably looked the part. I asked him if he had any Buddy Guy. He leaned way out over the counter, looked me right in the eyes and said, "Whatís chubby white boy like you doing over here looking for Buddy Guy for, huh?""
 
 
I've had similar experiences before! :)  
 
quote:
"PBS had a great special a few years ago called Miles Ahead about Miles Davis. Iíve still got it too. In it Miles talks about how he had to learn from others, i.e., copy their licks. At one point he says something that is profound. He said, "You have to play a long time before you can get your sound." What he meant is he copied the other guys until he mastered that. Then, and only then, he created his unique sound."
 
 
There's a great deal of truth to that (in my opinion). There was a drummer in the studio for the last two weeks who played with Miles. He had some stories!!!! (ha, ha)  
 
quote:
"In that same special Gil Evans talks about the same thing. He made the motions of a funnel with sand coming out of it and said, "Miles took all these other guys [Dizzy, Bird, Monk, and Bud Powell] mixed them together, and out came Miles Davis."
 
 
Most of the greats create a melting pot and eventually their own thing comes out in the end. It's a really cool way to look at it.  
 
quote:
"Iím still in the "learning the other guys" stage myself. But, I donít care; Iím enjoying myself."
 
 
That's all that counts!!! Have FUN when you play and the rest will take care of itself in the long run.  
 
quote:
"What Stevie did was take all those other guys, mixed them together and came out with Stevie Ray. When I hear the imitators, all I hear is a guy taking Steveie Ray and funneling out his attempt at Stevie Ray."
 
 
Most people do not dig back. That's the problem with many players both past and present. As a session guy I used to always dig back to the people who influenced the greats. You can discover sooooo much more this way. I call it educating yourself :)  
 
quote:
"Theyíre better than I am, most of them. But theyíre still in the copy stage, not in the create stage. Iím into the real thing. And buddy, Albert King was the real deal!"
 
 
The thing to always rememeber is "better" is simply a frame of mind. If you can express yourself on the guitar and play what you hear in your head ... that's what counts.  
 
quote:
"Now, donít you ever bring that up again. I got nuts when I start thinking about them..."
 
 
I won't :) Most people do not realize how much SRV borrowed from him but it's cool because they jammed together when SRV was younger. They both sound cool to me!!  
 
Stormy Monday (opsss...it's Friday)  
Trace
 
4/28/2000 2:52 AM
Steve A.
Re: Good call, Steve
Trace:  
 
Look at it statistically. Can drugs help enhance creativity?  
 
    I couldn't find the post you were quoting but it has been proven that musicians on drugs think that they are being much more creative than they really are... < grin >  
 
Steve Ahola
 
4/28/2000 6:03 PM
Trace

quote:
"I couldn't find the post you were quoting but it has been proven that musicians on drugs think that they are being much more creative than they really are... < grin >"
 
 
You're right about that! (ha, ha) I've seen it more times that I could ever possibly count. The funny thing most musicians that use drugs usually do so because it helps them to simply play rather than letting their brain get in the way.  
 
The greatest players (generally speaking) just play and never really think about it. Once they start to think they loose the "zone" they were in. This is why many people use drugs, in the studio anyways.  
 
It takes a long time for most people to be able to get in the "zone" without the use of drugs or alcohol.  
 
Trace
 

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