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Chassis


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9/20/1999 1:49 PM
DaveK
Chassis
I'm a home builder building my own design from scratch. I've spent hours designing, simulating, calculating, and optimizing and I've arrived at what I think will be a great 1x12 combo. Trouble is, I can't find a chassis to build it on. A Hammond chassis isn't really long enough. (17" across the front wont quite do it for a cabinet size in between a Deluxe Reverb and a Princeton) I've looked into having a couple custom fabricated, and I'll probably have to go that route. My question is this -  
 
I can do all the punching and drilling myself. I can have a faceplate made up after. All I need is a solid bare bones chassis. If you were to tell a supplier what you would want in such a product, what would it be? What is the best chassis for a home builder building from scratch. What are the best dimensions, material, etc?  
 
 
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9/20/1999 5:25 PM
Gil Ayan

quote:
"I've looked into having a couple custom fabricated, and I'll probably have to go that route. My question is this -  
 
I can do all the punching and drilling myself. I can have a faceplate made up after. All I need is a solid bare bones chassis. If you were to tell a supplier what you would want in such a product, what would it be? What is the best chassis for a home builder building from scratch. What are the best dimensions, material, etc?"
 
 
 
 
If you will have the chassis made, you might as well have all the holes in it already. The machine shop will charge you penuts for that and remember, if you're using stainless teel, drilling the smallest holes can be a pain in the ass. If you are using aluminum, 1/2" is probably about as big a hole as you can make before things start to get real cheesy.  
 
 
 
For what it'w worth, I had some custom chassis built and the size was (outside dimensions):  
 
 
 
width = 19"  
 
height = 2.5"  
 
depth = 8"  
 
 
 
It is slightly larger than a Boogie chassis, so that you can have an idea. I used 1/8" thich (yes, THICK) aluminum, because it was easier to work with than SS, and lighter than say zinc plated steel. I didn't know where the transformers were going to go, etc., so since I had to do a fair amount of drilling, that was taken into account too. However, all of the other holes were pre-drilled -- yes, includng the funky-shaped one for the power cord strain relief bushing. The machine shop laser cut those puppies and they look like 1,000,000 bucks -- much smoother than I could do with a drill. It worked out pretty well.  
 
 
 
Good luck,  
 
 
 
Gil
 
9/20/1999 8:42 PM
DaveK

 
 
How much did it cost to have these made? A couple of the  
 
places I talked to required a set up fee upward of $200.  
 
How many places did you have to check out before you found  
 
one that would do it?  
 
 
9/20/1999 8:58 PM
Gil Ayan

quote:
"How much did it cost to have these made? A couple of the  
 
places I talked to required a set up fee upward of $200.  
 
How many places did you have to check out before you found  
 
one that would do it?  
 
"
 
 
 
 
That is a very good question, Dave. For starters, knowing that these places will charge you an arm and a leg if you go in small quantities, I joined forces with a few friends and was ble to gather an order for 12 pieces. Then, I had to make a drawing that I could send out for quotes -- so EVERYTHING has to be right, dimensions, tolerances, welds where applicable, etc. -- and I talked to about 4 or 5 places. Most of them local to me (Los Angeles), and one outfit in Flint, Michigan which came out way cheaper than the others -- by about 30%.  
 
 
 
In addition to that, I hav friend who had referred me to the MI place and had nothing but great things to say about them. The decision was an easy one, and they got the job from us. The chassis included all of the holes -- except for transformer mounting holes (and holes for the grommets) -- and included 8-32 inserts for mounting -- the inserts are press-fitted in and are needed because we used aluminum for the chassis.  
 
 
 
Make a long story short, we paid just under $60 per chassis, and they look simply great -- the thing is folded and welded and the weld are virtually invisible. Of course, getting the chassis painted and silkscreened upped the pirce to just under $100 per chassis. The artwork and silkscreening were done at another place, local to me... and that is a bit of a pain.  
 
 
 
If you want any of the information regarding these places, simply email me and I will be glad to give you the names and telephone numbers. I have nothing but positive things to say about all of the shops I used.  
 
 
 
Gil
 
9/20/1999 10:07 PM
Ed

Hello Gil:  
 
 
 
 
 
Do you have any chassis that you would be willing to sell or are they spoken for? Or would you share the layout as to the design ideas? you can e-mail me if you prefer to. I also want to build a few amps from the ground up, but without getting a resale liscense to get parts at a good price it gets pricey, and the state board of EQ. doesn't issue unless you are going to sell them. Right now I am building it for myself, and still trying different things out, and would like to keep the cost down somewhat. Do you have any ideas or suggestions? Most of these parts people will only sell to dealers, and the list prices are getting up there. But maybe thats how it goes.  
 
 
 
Thanks Ed
 
9/20/1999 11:06 PM
Gil Ayan

quote:
"Hello Gil:  
 
Do you have any chassis that you would be willing to sell or are they spoken for?"
 
 
 
 
'Fraid I have none left for sale.  
 
 
 
quote:
"Or would you share the layout as to the design ideas? you can e-mail me if you prefer to."
 
 
 
 
Email me and we can take it from there.  
 
 
 
quote:
" I also want to build a few amps from the ground up, but without getting a resale liscense to get parts at a good price it gets pricey, and the state board of EQ."
 
 
 
 
For what it's worth, even though I do have a resale license in CA (because I have a small side business), the majority of the parts came from Mouser Electronics, where they do not discriminate between wholesale and retail!  
 
 
 
Then, the transformers for the first amp came from Hoffman... who is the same way, and the sockets came from Angela Instruments (great socket, better than the stuff I got from either New Sensor or Magic Parts).  
 
 
 
quote:
" doesn't issue unless you are going to sell them."
 
 
 
 
I guess that makes sense. :) However, if you intedn to go into business, check with the State Board; things you purchase for the development of prorotypes, with intent to produce them for profit at a later time, are NOT subject to sales tax -- if I remember correctly -- at least not here in California.  
 
 
 
quote:
"somewhat. Do you have any ideas or suggestions? Most of these parts people will only sell to dealers, and the list prices are getting up there. But maybe thats how it goes."
 
 
 
 
I would build my first amp insode of another one. Only after I knew what I wanted did I go after the custom-made chassis. But if you already know, say , that you will want a chassis just like the marshall TSL, for example, then I guess all you need to do is start scaling those amps and making a drawing. :)  
 
 
 
Gil  
 
9/21/1999 4:12 AM
Bruce

Ed, if Gil really doesn't have anything to spare, I might be able to help you out with something.  
 
My sheet metal shop has a 25 pc minimum order and sometimes I get about 2/3 the way through them and decide I want it different from then on!  
 
I also have a big handfull of generic unpunched chassis.  
 
So I might have a few that can be made to work for a number of projects up to 100watts.  
 
Sorry, no steel and I use .080"" aluminum not .125".  
 
 
 
Bruce  
 
Mission Amps
 

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